With COVID 19 protocols shutting down our local schools, its up to parents and caregivers to keep some of those educational elements going (or at least something to keep those kids busy!). The Allied Arts Education Project Teaching Artists have put some of their classroom workshops into more home based tutorials that we hope you’ll find helpful. Just like our lessons in the classroom, many of these tutorials not only touch on how to make art, but tie in with other lessons like science, history or physics. Happy arting!

Lesson Plans

Creative Composition – Not a Drawing Class

Main Idea
In Art, Composition is the way you arrange things in your picture – or whatever else you’re making!. The Composition makes a HUGE difference in what people think when they see it. Let’s learn to get creative with your Compositions.

Examples: Same drawing, just different compositions.

Your Turn
Find a simple outline shape of something and cut it out to use as a pattern. Cutting it out of heavy paper or light cardboard makes it
easier to trace. Find something simple. Old coloring books are good.

Don’t worry about fancy drawing now. That’s not what this lesson is about. It’s about making your Compositions more creative, remember?

Make new Compositions by tracing the pattern in different arrangements. Make at least three different Compositions on different papers. Try for five, or even ten. (Working with a partner sometimes helps. Sometimes not.)

Tips:

  • It’s okay if your subject goes off the edge of the paper. You still know it’s a cat, even if you only see half of it.
  • Learn to draw things overlapping. Trace the thing you want in front first. Start tracing the thing you want to be behind it. Stop when you come to the front thing.
  • Pictures are generally more interesting if the subject is Doing Something. Running, sleeping, sniffing, laughing, . . . .

Take Your Picture to the Next Level

  • How many different compositions can you make?
  • Ask different people to write captions for them.
  • Add different backgrounds. Day/night. Inside/outside. Undersea/in the city.
  • Use a copy machine to make the pattern in different sizes. Use them together. Old/young? Far away/near by?
  • Add some details. Give a dog a bone.
  • Now add color!

Creative Composition Takeaways (What I hope you learned that will make all of your future artwork better.)
Any time you do some Art:

  • Arrange the characters in an interesting way. Imagine different compositions before you start.
  • Have your characters doing something. If you asked someone, “What’s happening in this picture?, what would they say?

Click here for more information about Janet.

SCIENCE AND ART LESSON Energy and your brain

  • Exercise with relaxation Energy and your brain
  • Carbohydrates provide energy to your brain and the cells in your body. The front of the human brain is larger than any other animal’s, even the dinosaur’s!
  • The left side of your brain is usually better at problem solving, math and writing. The right side of the brain is creative and helps you to be good at art or music. If you are right handed you use the left side of your brain more and opposite with left handed people.
  • The brain stores all sorts of things in the memory including facts and figures and all the smells, tastes and things you have seen, heard or touched.
  • Some ways to help keep energy in your brain active and healthy are:
  • Eating healthy food like fish and fresh vegetables provide the building blocks for a healthy brain. And carbohydrates that give you the energy along with other foods can be found in apples, bananas, grapes, raisins. These also give you extras such as vitamins and minerals.
  • Complex carbohydrates come from food like bread, cereals, pasta and veggies like corn, potatoes and carrots. They give you energy more slowly so it lasts longer and they have heaps of vitamins and minerals, which your body needs.
  • Exercising your brain by learning new things and trying to remember them. Getting plenty of sleep.

Right brain and left brain: Materials needed: blank paper, pencil, markers One way to exercise your brain and create the movement of energy is to use both sides of your brain. You may be right or left handed…Today we are going to use both sides to the brain. The more your stimulate the other side of your brain (called the non-dominant side) the more easily you’ll learn a variety of skills. So if you brush your teeth with your right hand, try it with your left hand. If you hold your fork in your left hand, try the opposite. Mandalas are an ancient art form found in all parts of the world. Since the design is balanced on both sides it can create a peaceful sense in your brain balancing both sides. First we will create a design on the blank paper of what you think your brain energy looks like. It must have some type of motion or movement. It creates and electrical stimulus to your muscles. have fun creating a design with your dominant hand. Take a couple minutes. Now take your non dominant hand and create the same idea on the other side of the paper. Mandalas are an ancient art form found in all parts of the world. Since the design is balanced on both sides it can create a peaceful sense in your brain balancing both sides.

 

Learn more about Kathy’s work in with our Arts Education Project.

For hundreds of years, people have harnessed moving air (wind) to do work. The earliest forms of wind-powered machines were sailboats. Wind pushing against the sails of a boat provided the energy to move the boat across the water, saving people the trouble of rowing. Later, people discovered that if they attached sail-like panels to a wheel at the top of a stationary tower, wind blowing against the panels would cause the wheel and the central shaft to which it was attached to turn. The shaft drove mechanisms inside the tower that were used to mill, or grind, grain into flour. And even though wind-driven machines are now also used to pump water from wells and to generate electricity, the name windmill has stuck. Here’s a little more about how we harness the wind today. Today we are going to create paper airplanes that will fly with the use of wind. Supplies needed: markers printed paper designs – use Paper Airplane design simple or Paper Airplane design fancy scissors Instructions:

  1. Use the markers to color the printouts or make your own design on a plain piece of paper.
  2. Use one of the tutorials found here to fold your paper airplane, use scissors to cut your paper down if needed
  3. Go outside and fly them! (but be sure to pick them up when you’re done!)

Learn more about Kathy’s work with the Allied Arts Education Project

SCIENCE AND ART NORTHERN LIGHTS / AURORA BOREALIS

  1. Exercise with deep breathing x 1 minute.
  2. Today we are going to create pictures of the aurora borealis. The sun is 93 million miles away. It sometimes creates great solar storms and sends gusts of particles across space. When they reach planet earth our magnetic field and atmosphere react and give out light similar to neon lights. The northern lights begin their performances. They can appear as sheds of light or curtains but also arcs and spirals.
  3. Watch this video on YouTube about the Northern Lights for inspiration.
  4. On black construction paper first use white oil pastels in gray or white. Create some horizontal lines across the bottom the page for mountains and dots for stars. Now use colorful chalk pastels to create your northern lights. These can be bleneded and smudged to create interesting patterns.

Learn more about Kathy’s work with the Allied Arts Education Project

Warm up exercises. Deep breathing and shoulder hand and neck exercises. How energy gets things done. To move and to do work you must have energy. You must eat healthy, get plenty of exercise and rest to produce energy. The type of energy we are going to focus on today is called kinetic energy—energy due to motion. All moving objects have kinetic energy. This is what puts things in motion. For instance, think of bowling. The energy in our bodies sends a bowling ball racing towards the pins providing it with lots of kinetic energy to hit the bowing pins. Also think of the sun and how it keeps all the planets in the solar system in motion. These planets aren’t falling into the sun. It’s their kinetic energy that keeps them in their orbits . Today we will look at the work of Keith Haring an artist of the 1970s and 80’s. He grew up in Philadelphia with his parents and 3 sisters. When he was young 6-7 he would sit with his father and watch him create cartoons. Keith was also interested in cartoons and began drawing them himself. In his late teens he began creating graffiti on walls in the subways and on buildings in New York. He was fascinated with the idea of motion as we’ve been talking about. So most of his work appears to show movement. Watch this video on YouTube about Keith Haring’s work to get inspired. Today we are going to create some Haring type characters. When drawing your characters think of them using kinetic energy to move. Materials needed: Pencil Thick Paper or cardboard Aluminum Foil Permanent Markers in various colors

  1. With a pencil draw some characters in movement. Think of a story they might tell. You may add other symbols, landscapes and backgrounds as you wish but keep them simple.
  2. Wrap a piece of cardboard or thick paper with aluminum foil. With the foil it is important to not press too hard when doing the next part of this art work as you don’t want to tear the foil. Place your drawing on top of the foil and trace over it with your pencil. Be sure to keep your hand on the paper so it doesn’t move and don’t lift your paper until you’ve drawn over the entire drawing as you will lose your place and it will be difficult to place it back directly.
  3. Now take the aluminum foil and with a black marker outline the design you’ve transferred.
  4. Fill in characters with felt pen colors using the style of Keith Haring.
  5. After completing that part now create some motion designs, and complete the outside of your design in any manner you like. The characters may be outside, in the forest, or inside.
  6. Place your names and dates on the back of the foil.
Use this handouts to learn what early schools were like in Whatcom County Early Days of the First Schools in Whatcom County Then make your own ink: Ink recipes Learn how to write in script: McGuffy script alphabet And do some of the same lessons that pioneer children did: Reading and ‘Riting Things to do at home or Early Schools Can and Can’t booklet Learn more about Janet and her work in the schools with our Arts Education Project
The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice. Click here for more information about Rachel.
The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice. Click here for more information about Rachel.
The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice. Click here for more information about Rachel.
The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice. Click here for more information about Rachel.
The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice. Click here for more information about Rachel.
The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice. Click here for more information about Rachel.

The following videos are hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice.

 Click here for more information about Rachel.

The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice.

 Click here for more information about Rachel.

The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice.

 Click here for more information about Rachel.

The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice.

 Click here for more information about Rachel.

The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice.

 Click here for more information about Rachel.

The following video is hosted on YouTube and may be removed without notice.

 Click here for more information about Rachel.