Stand & Resist 2017-01-20T14:59:00+00:00

Local environmental group Stand.earth and arts group Allied Arts are currently accepting application for the visual arts exhibit, Stand and Resist: Artists Protect the Salish Sea.

Stand and Resist: Artists Protect the Salish Sea is a week-long showcase of local and regional artists who explore the intertwined issues of the Salish Sea, place and home, climate and fossil fuel threats, and alternative futures. The exhibit will take place during the last two weeks of March in downtown Bellingham.

Read below for guidelines and apply online using the button at the bottom of the page.

Application Guidelines for Stand and Resist: Artists Protect the Salish Sea

Applications due: Monday, February 20th, 2017 by 5pm

Show date: Late March 2017

Show length: One to two weeks, depending on venue availability

Media: Any visual medium (2D, sculpture, textile, video, ceramic, etc.)

Final work due: ~March 18th

Fees: No jury fees or submission fees

Commission and sales: Artists are free to display sale price and direct contact information. No commission will be collected on art sales made during Stand and Resist

Reception: The community will be invited to a kick-off reception on opening night of the exhibit

Submissions

Number of submissions: Artists may submit up to three pieces for consideration to be included in the exhibit. Please email [email protected] directly if you have special space requirements, large pieces to show, or an exhibit series that exceeds three pieces.

Setup and takedown: Artists are not required to be present during exhibit hours but are required to assist in setup and takedown of the exhibit space. Artists must handcraft all merchandise, no exceptions.

Submission descriptions: Artist exhibitor applicants must attach a long (100 word) and short (25 word) description of the work they plan to show. Applicants must also provide at least 4 digital images (digital or hard copy) of their work and accompanying image list to be reviewed. 

Allied Arts membership: Participation is open to all current Allied Arts Members at any level of membership. Artists may sign up for membership when they submit their application.

Tabling

Space permitting, nonprofit information tables will be a part of Stand and Resist. Local nonprofits and government agencies working on Salish Sea, social equity, tribal, and environmental issues are encouraged to interact with the community during open house events and to display literature during the exhibit.

More about Stand and Resist: Artists Protect the Salish Sea

Stand and Resist: Artists Protect the Salish Sea is a week-long showcase of local and regional artists who explore the intertwined issues of the Salish Sea, place and home, climate and fossil fuel threats, and alternative futures. The exhibit will take place during the last two weeks of March in downtown Bellingham.

For this exhibit, we are looking to bring together existing and new art that explores the ideas of Home, Threat, Resistance, and Future/Vision. By this, we mean:

Home: The Salish Sea, the places we live here in western Washington and southwest British Columbia. Is home a place, or people? Is it houses, economy, family, trees, the sea itself? What do we hold on to when we fight for the places we love?

Threat: For decades, increasing amounts of fossil fuels have poured through our waterways, with yet more proposed. Just like the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Kinder Morgan Pipeline threatens waterways from BC to Washington; the Gateway Pacific Coal terminal would destroy tribal fisheries; and daily oil trains threaten disastrous derailment along the thriving shores of Skagit and Whatcom Counties, delivering toxic cargo to March and Cherry points while rolling across traditional Coast Salish territories. And all of it contributes to climate change, to sea level rise, to ocean acidification, and the eventual (possible) end of this place itself.

Resistance: Led by tribes and other local residents, resistance in recent years has been varied, deep, and creative. From rallies and concerts to political action to the Totem Pole Journeys, from the Kwel hoy’ ceremony in 2012 to nonviolent direct action in Everett, Bellingham, and during 2016’s Break Free, people who love this place have stood up to fight back against the threat to our home. What has that looked like? What can it look like? what does it mean for this place? And what does it mean about the kind of people that we are?  

Future/Vision:  The seas will rise, and accidents will happen. The only safe tanker, the only safe oil train, the only safe pipeline, is no tanker or oil train or pipeline at all. But what does it look like if we fail to stop catastrophic climate change? What will this place, our culture look like if we do find and implement a better, clean-energy way? Who will be here in a century or two to witness the resurgence of the salmon--or, perhaps, the Last Salmon?

 

Apply Here